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blarger

Anxiety types

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Many people here claim to suffer from various types of anxiety and often seek benzos and antidepressants as remedies. I too thought that I suffered from anxiety, but then I really thought about it and critiqued my assumption, and realized that I very rarely feel fear, dread, lack of confidence, or concern about impending events. I realized that my feeling was more like "discomfort" than anything -- so based on this idea I developed a way to classify types of anxiety based on an assumption: that there are three basic things you can do when facing a situation or environment: withdraw, act, or gather more information as to whether you should withdraw or act, and that an anxiety-ish state corresponds to each of these.

 

Action "anxiety"-- This is the stimulated, excited, heightened state when a person is engaged in something from which there is "no turning back" -- an actor on stage, a doctor in surgery, an athlete in the middle of a game, a writer in the middle of a burst of creative inspiration -- here its full attention and emotional involvement to the outcome of the thing one is engaged in. People when in this state can seem hypersensitive, demanding, obsessed, aloof. When stuck in this mode in everyday life it is a manic narcissism or at least some kind of overeager overextension of one's resources -- "jugglers"

 

 

"Uncertain/uncomforable anxiety" -- This is the anxiety of Hamlet, always debated whether and how to act or not, indicated by the extreme alertness to the surroundings, tense quietness followed by occasional funny attention grabbing outbursts or sarcastic remarks. When stuck in this mode you are being the average neurotic type, son of a Jewish mother perhaps.

 

 

 

Withdrawn anxiety -- this is where a person retreats into their shell entertaining feelings of fear, dread, self-hate etc. without going into any "action mode", while in this mode, life is lived by passive sidestepping, not toeing the line or plowing forth like the other two. Or if they do act, its antisocial even criminal action. Shut ins, Wallowers, advanced alcoholics, gargoyles, REAL APD types. (I bet most people here who claim APD are more of the uncertain/uncomfortable type)

 

 

This is clealy phenomenological but it would make sense to me that our brains should have three distinct states and corresponding feelings for each of the three possibilities. As such, therapies should be targeted along these lines. In the first case, the person needs less stimulation, less drama, in order to kill their reported "anxiety", so a benzo may be in order along with more relaxation time. In the second, the person just needs a bit more confidence and comfort with oneself, which might require a different mental framework with which to socially engage -- I bet these types respond best to CBT or any sort of therapy that is about belief restructuring, even just lifting to look better and feel more confident. In the last, these people are likely outright depressed and have been traumatized some way or other, and probably need a more multipronged therapeutic approach.

 

Of course any person can experience and cycle through all three of these states but one is probably the "root" or default problem and should be treated first to see if the cycling desists. Just a theory, I wonder if this works for anyone else?

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Many people here claim to suffer from various types of anxiety and often seek benzos and antidepressants as remedies. I too thought that I suffered from anxiety, but then I really thought about it and critiqued my assumption, and realized that I very rarely feel fear, dread, lack of confidence, or concern about impending events. I realized that my feeling was more like "discomfort" than anything -- so based on this idea I developed a way to classify types of anxiety based on an assumption: that there are three basic things you can do when facing a situation or environment: withdraw, act, or gather more information as to whether you should withdraw or act, and that an anxiety-ish state corresponds to each of these.

 

Action "anxiety"-- This is the stimulated, excited, heightened state when a person is engaged in something from which there is "no turning back" -- an actor on stage, a doctor in surgery, an athlete in the middle of a game, a writer in the middle of a burst of creative inspiration -- here its full attention and emotional involvement to the outcome of the thing one is engaged in. People when in this state can seem hypersensitive, demanding, obsessed, aloof. When stuck in this mode in everyday life it is a manic narcissism or at least some kind of overeager overextension of one's resources -- "jugglers"

"Uncertain/uncomforable anxiety" -- This is the anxiety of Hamlet, always debated whether and how to act or not, indicated by the extreme alertness to the surroundings, tense quietness followed by occasional funny attention grabbing outbursts or sarcastic remarks. When stuck in this mode you are being the average neurotic type, son of a Jewish mother perhaps.

Withdrawn anxiety -- this is where a person retreats into their shell entertaining feelings of fear, dread, self-hate etc. without going into any "action mode", while in this mode, life is lived by passive sidestepping, not toeing the line or plowing forth like the other two. Or if they do act, its antisocial even criminal action. Shut ins, Wallowers, advanced alcoholics, gargoyles, REAL APD types. (I bet most people here who claim APD are more of the uncertain/uncomfortable type)

This is clealy phenomenological but it would make sense to me that our brains should have three distinct states and corresponding feelings for each of the three possibilities. As such, therapies should be targeted along these lines. In the first case, the person needs less stimulation, less drama, in order to kill their reported "anxiety", so a benzo may be in order along with more relaxation time. In the second, the person just needs a bit more confidence and comfort with oneself, which might require a different mental framework with which to socially engage -- I bet these types respond best to CBT or any sort of therapy that is about belief restructuring, even just lifting to look better and feel more confident. In the last, these people are likely outright depressed and have been traumatized some way or other, and probably need a more multipronged therapeutic approach.

 

Of course any person can experience and cycle through all three of these states but one is probably the "root" or default problem and should be treated first to see if the cycling desists. Just a theory, I wonder if this works for anyone else?

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I was court ordered to see a psychiatrist and they said I had a mild anxiety disorder, but they didn'tknow I was prescribed adderall. Now, I take 10mg paxil before bed and 5 mg ritalin BID, although I'm prescribed 20mg paxil/day and 40mg/day rialin. I really have to control the anxiety.

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