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So, I'm slowly coming to the conclusion that I have IBS. Cant touch milk, stimulants (coffee/tobacco), and some kinds of meat, I think, (or maybe its just fried meat) without having some serious digestive issues I'll spare everyone the details of.

 

I'm pretty sure its largely job related. With that in mind, I'm working on quitting. In the meantime, Im treating it with probiotics...

 

http://www.jarrow.com/product.php?prodid=269 (popping like tic tacs)

 

4 tbsp psyllium husks/day with lots of water,

 

and aloe vera juice.

 

I also take 2-3 g of ascorbic acid a day, 1g ashwagandha, and 3 g fish oil.

 

Is there anything else I should add to this?

 

 

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Yogurt with live cultures?

 

 

No good. I'm lactose intolerant. My last experience with milk based probiotics was with homemade kefir. After a week of the trots I figured it wasnt a die-off of harmful yeasts or a "healing crisis" or something and that I should just avoid milk products. :)

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I went through a bout of IBS about 3 years ago. I was stuck in a dead end job, the stress was mounting. And certain triggers just made me shit my brains out. Long story short - once the stressor was gone it immediately cleared up. In my opinoin it is totally a mind - bowel connection. I never found anything that really worked. It seemed I could get all the fiber in me I wanted but it never really did the trick.

 

No good. I'm lactose intolerant. My last experience with milk based probiotics was with homemade kefir. After a week of the trots I figured it wasnt a die-off of harmful yeasts or a "healing crisis" or something and that I should just avoid milk products. :)

 

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Long story short - once the stressor was gone it immediately cleared up. In my opinoin it is totally a mind - bowel connection.

 

;)

 

Which does not mean one cannot find 400 metabolic markers of one sort or another which are abnormal (the metabolic markers being abnormal secondary to the primary emotional stuff). And perhaps there are even pharmacological/supp interventions on some of those markers. But the real problem, in many cases is as he as stated...or at least that is a huge component (obviously one needs to be genetically susceptable...).

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I went through a bout of IBS about 3 years ago. I was stuck in a dead end job, the stress was mounting. And certain triggers just made me shit my brains out. Long story short - once the stressor was gone it immediately cleared up. In my opinoin it is totally a mind - bowel connection. I never found anything that really worked. It seemed I could get all the fiber in me I wanted but it never really did the trick.

 

 

I totally agree with you, I'm just working on treating it until I can quit.

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Initially try 10g mixed in with your food (tomato goes well), and push upto 20g if there is no problems. That dose is based on Total BM of 100Kg, but I would not vary too much on bodyweight, as the main site of action would be in the GI tract itself.

J

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Initially try 10g mixed in with your food (tomato goes well), and push upto 20g if there is no problems. That dose is based on Total BM of 100Kg, but I would not vary too much on bodyweight, as the main site of action would be in the GI tract itself.

J

 

Thanks!

 

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Josh are you sure you mean tumeric for irritable bowel syndrome as opposed to using it for inflammatory bowel disease? (IBD VS IBS).

 

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Josh are you sure you mean tumeric for irritable bowel syndrome as opposed to using it for inflammatory bowel disease? (IBD VS IBS).

 

What's the difference Scott?

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What's the difference Scott?

 

 

IBD=inflammatory bowel disease=crohns or ulcerative colitis.

 

 

IBS=irritable bowel=usuall the topic on the board.

http://www.ibsgroup.org/main/diagnosis.shtml

 

suffice to say I would wonder if curcumin/tumeric because it promotes bile release would be helpful or irritating to people with the second.

 

 

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IBD=inflammatory bowel disease=crohns or ulcerative colitis.

IBS=irritable bowel=usuall the topic on the board.

http://www.ibsgroup.org/main/diagnosis.shtml

 

suffice to say I would wonder if curcumin/tumeric because it promotes bile release would be helpful or irritating to people with the second.

 

 

Oh, crud. So taurine might be in the same boat here then too? I take a decent amount of that as well..

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I take boat loads of prebiotics - about 20g of FOS adaya, and 4 enterically coated probiotic capsules by Healthspan, in two daily servings. I also consume a lot of coconut oil, and cut out sugar, unfiltered water, preservatives and alcohol. Seems to have stabilised everything and I can seem to tollerate alcohol currently.

 

 

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Peppermint and caraway oil (enterically coated) have been used for IBS, though research has been contradictory at times.

 

Rees WD, Evans BK, Rhodes J. Treating irritable bowel syndrome with peppermint oil. Br Med J. 1979;2:835–836.

 

Dew MJ, Evans BK, Rhodes J. Peppermint oil for the irritable bowel syndrome: a multicentre trial. Br J Clin Pract. 1984;38:394, 398.

 

Lawson MJ, Knight RE, Tran K, et al. Failure of enteric-coated peppermint oil in the irritable bowel syndrome: a randomized, double-blind crossover study. J Gastroenterol Hepatol. 1988;3:235–238.

 

Nash P, Gould SR, Barnardo DE. Peppermint oil does not relieve the pain of irritable bowel syndrome. Br J Clin Pract. 1986;40:292–293.

 

Liu JH, Chen GH, Yeh HZ, et al. Enteric-coated peppermint-oil capsules in the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome: a prospective, randomized trial. J Gastroenterol. 1997;32:765–768.

 

Kline RM, Kline JJ, Di Palma J, et al. Enteric-coated, pH-dependent peppermint oil capsules for the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome in children. J Pediatr. 2001;138:125–128.

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Oh, crud. So taurine might be in the same boat here then too? I take a decent amount of that as well..

 

Not to my knowledge. I only know of milk thistle and curcumin which have this effect.

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Peppermint and caraway oil (enterically coated) have been used for IBS, though research has been contradictory at times.

 

I think Jodi tried peppermint oil at my suggestion a while back, not sure if it helped any.

 

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I read thru the toxicological studies for tumeric and found reference to impaired mucin purported to cause gastric lesions. but only upon high dosing with tumeric in albino Porter strain rats. I would recommend against the dosages Josh recommended in this case, and propose use of an extract at much lower doses. It should not be used with oil as this increases uptake beyond that seen for water suspensions (60%).

 

The taurine congugates bile acids (which is good). The inflammatory control exerted by tumeric is perhaps worth the slight risk of irritation in some cases. When conditions of inadequate mucin production or scarring due to long standing infection or irritation exist, I would not recommend using it.

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I think Jodi tried peppermint oil at my suggestion a while back, not sure if it helped any.

Yes, I did try the peppermint oil and it was a miracle :) It worked very well. Unfortunately, my conditions got worse and worse. First they tried Zelnorm and that worked for a while but caused a lot of stomach cramping. Now I'm now on a med called Levsin which has done wonders and without any side effect. Apparantely it helps with the colon spasms which sounds weird because my condition is constipation.

 

Anyway, Peppermint Oil and Papaya tablets were the best natural things I found to help.

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So, I'm slowly coming to the conclusion that I have IBS. Cant touch milk, stimulants (coffee/tobacco), and some kinds of meat, I think, (or maybe its just fried meat) without having some serious digestive issues I'll spare everyone the details of.

 

I'm pretty sure its largely job related. With that in mind, I'm working on quitting. In the meantime, Im treating it with probiotics...

 

http://www.jarrow.com/product.php?prodid=269 (popping like tic tacs)

 

4 tbsp psyllium husks/day with lots of water,

 

and aloe vera juice.

 

I also take 2-3 g of ascorbic acid a day, 1g ashwagandha, and 3 g fish oil.

 

Is there anything else I should add to this?

 

Ahh you have discovered the ways of Jarrow!

 

I wouldn't choose that particular product. They do several, enterically coated, all microbial. I take 20g of FOS a day with probiotics in 2 or more doses. Sometimes I consume 30g FOS.

 

I would suggest that the psyllium husks you replace with bulk FOS. The husks can be irritating and is claimed to scrape the good bugs off the gut wall (that may just be theory).

 

I'd then get my fibre from raw fresh fruit like berries, carrots and apples. Eat regularly. This has sorted my problems, alomng with increased regular O3 intake via mackerel.

 

I also cut out all sugar, and alcohol until stabilised.

 

 

 

 

 

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Josh are you sure you mean tumeric for irritable bowel syndrome as opposed to using it for inflammatory bowel disease? (IBD VS IBS).

 

I was thinking of IBS.

 

The dose I posted was one based on myself (no IBS), but I know of a case of turmeric use for IBS [Anecdotal], although I am unsure of the doses that he is running at. In light of the comments of scott & trouble, if you are considering turmeric, I would start from a smaller dose and suck it and see.

 

btw - what is your aloe dose?

 

J

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So, I'm slowly coming to the conclusion that I have IBS. Cant touch milk, stimulants (coffee/tobacco), and some kinds of meat, I think, (or maybe its just fried meat) without having some serious digestive issues I'll spare everyone the details of.

 

I'm pretty sure its largely job related. With that in mind, I'm working on quitting. In the meantime, Im treating it with probiotics...

 

http://www.jarrow.com/product.php?prodid=269 (popping like tic tacs)

 

4 tbsp psyllium husks/day with lots of water,

 

and aloe vera juice.

 

I also take 2-3 g of ascorbic acid a day, 1g ashwagandha, and 3 g fish oil.

 

Is there anything else I should add to this?

 

Is 2-3 g ascorbic acid really a good idea? Its know to irritate the gi tract in sensitive individuals.

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Is 2-3 g ascorbic acid really a good idea? Its know to irritate the gi tract in sensitive individuals.

 

 

Sorry, its Sodium Ascorbate. Dont know why I typed ascorbic acid.

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Update: Taking the probiotics by the 1/2 handfull before bed has done wonders. I'm pretty much back to normal now.

 

Haven't tried coffee yet though. If it turns out I cant drink decaff espresso anymore im going to be miffed. I just recently plunked $400 down on a prosumer grinder. :angry:

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First can we please be careful with terminology. IBS and IBD are serious conditions and you don't just get a bout of them for a couple of months. Just say you have stomach problems or something. I say this because I always worry what some lurker might see and misconstrue (getting bad advice).

 

Now more on topic. One no-no with IBS is choline, arginine, or nicotine. Basically anything that increases NO production or binds to the acetylcholine receptor.

 

From what I have read on the subject FOS has never been shown to have any effect on IBS.

 

Jodi is correct Levsin is the new wonder drug.

 

The best treatment still to this date though is hypnosis. No I am not joking. if you don't believe me look it up. Very high success rate.

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The best treatment still to this date though is hypnosis.

 

Have you thought about why and the implications?

 

"I have noticed a tremendous association between the emotions and the gut in patients with IBS. That being the case, psychological or emotional intervention is often quite effective in the treatment of IBS. Clinical studies have documented psychotherapy in the form of relaxation therapy, biofeedback, hypnosis, counseling, or stress management training significantly improves the symptoms of IBS. Many people with IBS find that daily leisurely walks markedly reduce symptoms, probably due to the known stress-reduction effects of exercise."

 

http://www.doctormurray.com/conditions/Irr...el_Syndrome.asp

 

Murray is a fairly good source of info althogh he does pimp stuff (his company natch).

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Have you thought about why and the implications?

 

Sure but I probably did not arrive at the conclusions you think. To me what this says is that IBS is very hard to treat with drugs. Mostly because the primary cause is acytalchonline stimulation leading to involuntary smooth muscle contractions. Now acytalcholine antagonists have awful mental side effects and smooth muscle relaxants have consequences for heat disease and/or stroke.

 

So in many ways the medical establishment is simply not willing to use more effective treatments because when weighed in the grand scheme of things it does more harm than good.

 

Thus we are left largely with relaxationn therapy and exercise both of which gradually but only minimaly improve neural tone.

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First can we please be careful with terminology. IBS and IBD are serious conditions and you don't just get a bout of them for a couple of months. Just say you have stomach problems or something. I say this because I always worry what some lurker might see and misconstrue (getting bad advice).

 

 

The Rome II Diagnostic Criteria (a system for diagnosing functional gastrointestinal disorders based on symptoms) for IBS is as follows:

 

At least 12 weeks or more, which need not be consecutive, in the preceding 12 months of abdominal discomfort or pain that is accompanied by at least two of the following features:

1) It is relieved with defecation, and/or

2) Onset is associated with a change in frequency of stool, and/or

3) Onset is associated with a change in form (appearance) of stool.

 

Other symptoms that are not essential but support the diagnosis of IBS:

 

* Abnormal stool frequency (greater than 3 bowel movements/day or less than 3 bowel movements/week);

* Abnormal stool form (lumpy/hard or loose/watery stool);

* Abnormal stool passage (straining, urgency, or feeling of incomplete evacuation);

* Passage of mucus;

* Bloating or feeling of abdominal distension.

 

 

Spook,

 

I didnt want to go into detail about my bowel movements, because I figured most people weren't interested in hearing about them. But, FWIW, I have had all of the above features/symptoms on and off for years, but at least weekly. I just put up with it. So I didnt just pull "IBS" out of my ass. (no pun intended)

 

Certain symptoms, which if you want further details of, I can provide upon request, spiked and became intolerable in the past few weeks, and I decided to do something about it.

 

 

 

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Dietary olive oil supplemented with fish oil, rich in EPA and DHA (n-3) polyunsaturated fatty acids, attenuates colonic inflammation in rats with DSS-induced colitis.

 

Camuesco D, Galvez J, Nieto A, Comalada M, Rodriguez-Cabezas ME, Concha A, Xaus J, Zarzuelo A. J Nutr. 2005 Apr;135(4):687-94.

 

Previous studies proposed a protective role of the dietary intake of (n-3) PUFA in human inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), but almost no studies have been performed using olive oil. The aims of the present study were to test the beneficial effects of an olive oil-based diet with or without fish oil, rich in (n-3) PUFA, in the dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) model of rat colitis and to elucidate the mechanisms involved in their potential beneficial effects, with special attention to the production of some of the mediators involved in the intestinal inflammatory response, such as leukotriene B(4) (LTB(4)), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha) and nitric oxide (NO). Rats were fed the different diets for 2 wk before colitis induction and thereafter until colonic evaluation 15 d later. Colitic rats fed the olive oil-based diet had a lower colonic inflammatory response than those fed the soybean oil diet, and this beneficial effect was increased by the dietary incorporation of (n-3) PUFA. A restoration of colonic glutathione levels and lower colonic NO synthase expression occurred in all colitic rats fed an olive oil diet compared with the control colitic group that consumed the soybean oil diet. However, (n-3) PUFA incorporation into an olive oil diet significantly decreased colonic TNFalpha and LTB(4) levels compared with colitic rats that were not supplemented with fish oil. These results affirm the benefits of an olive oil diet in the management of IBD, which are further enhanced by the addition of (n-3) PUFA.

 

Full free on-line article: http://jn.nutrition.org/cgi/content/full/135/4/687

 

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